Eggnog: A Christmas Tradition Goes Vegan

Eggnog-And-Spices-585

Cream, milk, eggs and … booze? That sure sounds like a strange combination of ingredients, but it’s one that, oddly enough, has become a holiday tradition. No one is for certain who to credit (or blame, depending on how you feel about it) for the invention of eggnog. History reveals that those crazy medieval folks were known to celebrate with a “hot drink of milk curdled with wine” (gag) and the concept grew from there.

Eggnog purists use raw yolks and sometimes the whites to create that rich and creamy grog. Spices are a must: cinnamon and nutmeg are the norm. But when it comes to liquor, basically anything goes; bourbon, whiskey, brandy, sherry and rum are popular favorites.

Now, while we’ve got nothing against a little holiday spirit you should know that eggnog is super high in calories and saturated fat! Good thing it’s a once a year indulgence!

If you’d rather save your calorie consumption for that pumpkin pie or yummy seasonal dessert (or if you’re avoiding dairy and eggs for any reason), give this non-dairy, egg-less version a try. It still has all that holiday flava’, but not nearly as much fat!

Vegan Eggnog

Prep time: 

Cook time: 

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Serves: 5 servings

Serving size: 8 oz

A dairy free, egg free version of the holiday classic.
Ingredients
  • 3 cups unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 cube (14 oz.) firm silken tofu
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 4 tsp vanilla
  • 1 heaping tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp allspice
  • ¼ tsp ground ginger
  • ¼ cup brandy, bourbon or rum
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend for 1 minute. Pour mixture into a saucepan and warm over medium heat. Do not boil
  2. Serve with a dusting of cinnamon or nutmeg.
Notes
If you like your eggnog served cold - add 8 ice cubes to the blender and whip until frothy.

What say ye? Are you a fan of eggnog? If so, you’re certainly not alone. In Puerto Rico, they get their holiday spirit on with a concoction of coconut milk and white rum called coquito, while those of Deutsch descent enjoy a thick, vodka-based, egg liqueur, known as eierlikör. —Karen

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